Thinking Green: How One Ebenezer Location is Shrinking Its Footprint

At Fairview, caring is what we do—not only for our patients, but for the earth and its resources as well.

As part of our ongoing work to improve environmental health, one of our Ebenezer senior care communities recently began ramping up its sustainability efforts with two exciting eco-friendly programs. Using grant funds from Hennepin County, Ebenezer’s Martin Luther Campus in Bloomington is working to encourage recycling on campus and jump-start an organic food collection program.

Revving up recycling

Martin Luther Campus recently purchased 84 additional recycling bins to help promote the location’s single-stream recycling system. While staff have been collecting cardboard from kitchen and housekeeping shipments, as well as aluminum cans in the break areas, there hasn’t been a concerted effort to encourage visitors or residents to recycle.

“Increasing the overall recycling program is something that residents, family members and staff have all shown interest in,” says Claire Purdie, an administrative intern at Martin Luther Campus.  “We were doing very minimal recycling at our facilities and are pleased to begin collecting recyclable materials throughout our buildings.”

The recycling program will help Martin Luther Campus conserve natural resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, save money and demonstrate its commitment to sustainability.

“With the additional recycling containers purchased with the grant funds, we’ll be able to make this program accessible and intuitive for everyone,” says Tyler Lang, environmental services director at the Martin Luther Campus.

Going organic

Martin Luther Campus’ grant also includes funds for an organics program. This project will help turn food waste from the campus’ prep areas and dining rooms into a rich, usable soil amendment.

The food waste will be collected and taken to a large composting facility, where it will be mixed with other organic materials and processed into compost. This composted material will then be used for organic farming, gardening and/or landscaping.

“Initial calculations show that we have the potential to collect an additional 7.7 tons of food waste,” says Mitch Thisius, nutrition and culinary director at Martin Luther Campus.

Reducing waste and conserving resources are two ways we’re fulfilling our mission to improve the health of the communities we serve.

To learn more about sustainability at Fairview, click here.

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