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Central Line Care Resources

There can be a lot to remember if you have a central line. There are also many different types of central lines, and the care can vary depending on the line. The videos below explain how to safely care for your central line at home.

Information is available for the following central lines:
Central Venous Catheters
Valved PICC lines
Non-Valved PICC lines

Please note: these videos only cover the types of central lines placed at Fairview Health Services, University of Minnesota Medical Center and University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital.

Central Venous Catheters (placed in the chest) 
Tunneled central venous catheters (CVC) are thin, flexible tubes (catheters) placed in a large vein. They deliver fluids and medicine into the vein and make it easy to get blood samples. The catheter enters through the chest wall and tunnels under the skin to a large vein near your heart. An anchoring cuff holds the catheter in place. A tunneled catheter can have more than one line and have clamps. Different companies make them, so they may look different than the one shown here, which is a Bard Power Hickman. CVC's are flushed with heparin or citrate to keep them from clotting, unless your care team says otherwise.

CVC – End Cap Change
 


CVC – Flushing the CVC

 


CVC – Bandage Change

 


Documents
Your Central Venous Catheter  
Caring for your CVC at home  
Changing the End Cap  
Flushing the Line with Heparin, Saline or Citrate   
Changing Your Bandage  
Handwashing and Skin Care
PICC Valved (placed inside arm)
Valved peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are thin, flexible tubes (catheters) placed in a large vein. They deliver fluids and medicine into the vein and make it easy to get blood samples. The catheter enters a large vein at or above the bend of your elbow, and is threaded through the vein until the tip reaches another large vein in your chest. Valved PICCs may have more than one line and do not have clamps. Different companies make them, so they may look different than the one shown here, which is a Bard Power PICC Solo. Valved PICCs are flushed with normal saline to keep them from clotting, unless your care team says otherwise.

PICC Valved – End Cap Change
 


PICC Valved – Flushing the PICC
 


Documents
Getting Ready for Your PICC 
Caring for Your PICC at Home 
Changing the End Cap 
Flushing the Line with Heparin, Saline or Citrate
Handwashing and Skin Care

PICC Non-Valved (placed inside arm)
Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are thin, flexible tubes (catheters) placed in a large vein. They deliver fluids and medicine into the vein and make it easy to get blood samples. The catheter enters a large vein at or above the bend of your elbow, and is threaded through the vein until the tip reaches another large vein in your chest. PICCs may have more than one line and have clamps. Different companies make them, so they may look different than the one shown here, which is a Bard Power PICC. PICCs are flushed with heparin or citrate to keep them from clotting, unless your care team says otherwise. 

PICC Non Valved - End Cap Change
 


PICC Non Valved – Flushing the PICC
 


Documents
Getting Ready for Your PICC 
Caring for Your PICC at Home 
Changing the End Cap 
Flushing the Line with Heparin, Saline or Citrate
Handwashing and Skin Care
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