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Fairview Sleep Centers
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Better sleep means better health


At Fairview Sleep Centers, we believe healthy sleep is essential for a healthy life. We all need sleep to be physically and mentally healthy, just as we need air, food and water to survive. Sleep disorders can keep you tossing and turning all night, leaving you feeling tired the next day.

Excessive daytime sleepiness isn’t just a nuisance—it can also threaten your safety and the safety of others. Untreated sleep apnea can contribute to serious health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, weight gain and stroke. Our team will work with you to develop a customized plan to treat your sleep problem. Last year, more than 3,500 people improved their health and the quality of their lives by visiting a Fairview sleep center. Contact us today, and you can be one of them.

Fairview’s sleep specialists offer sleep consultations and studies at five locations in the Twin Cities metro. We treat disorders ranging from the very common to the most complex, including:  
To make an appointment:
Brooklyn Park – 612-273-5000
Chisago City – 612-273-5000
Edina – 952-924-5053
Minneapolis – 612-273-5000
Princeton – 763-389-7740

To see if you’re at risk of sleep apnea, take our apnea risk assessment.

Related Services:

Our specialists work together to solve your sleep problems

  • Our sleep providers specialize in family, internal and pulmonary medicine, neurology, otolaryngology and psychology 
  • We work with other providers to manage pediatric and adult patients
  • We work with the University of Minnesota and other researchers to find solutions to sleep problems

Sleep Disorder Treatment Care Team

Our Providers Make the Difference
Fairview features nearly 4,000 providers practicing at over 200 locations throughout the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area and beyond. Fairview Clinics, University of Minnesota Physicians and our independent partner clinics provide an exceptional care experience, while lowering the overall costs of health care.

Locations by city:

Our Providers Make the Difference
Fairview features nearly 4,000 providers practicing at over 200 locations throughout the Minneapolis/St. Paul metro area and beyond. Fairview Clinics, University of Minnesota Physicians and our independent partner clinics provide an exceptional care experience, while lowering the overall costs of health care.

Media, News and Sleep Topics

Fairview Sleep Centers experts share their insights as well as the latest in sleep research and information from around the world.

Sleep Study_Bodyimage_CDM

Sleep and Teens
Conrad Iber, MD, program medical director of Fairview Sleep Centers, was one of several experts from across the country who spoke at a national conference on Sleep and Teens in October. Michael Howell, MD, sleep specialist with Fairview Sleep Centers, spoke to Fox 9 News on sleep issues for kids, including how early school start time impact children.

Getting kids ready for school? Put a camping trip on your "to-do" list
It appears that camping trips create better sleep schedules. An experiment examining the impact of 16 days of natural solar lighting during a camping trip in Colorado in six adults showed that sleep and melatonin timing (Melatonin's the hormone that controls your sleep and wake cycles.) became more consolidated and advanced nearly two hours in a natural camping environment as compared to return to artificial lighting. This finding supports what many pediatricians have known. It also suggests that a family camping trip before school starts might be a healthy family experience.

Attention parents: It's confirmed--tired preschoolers are more cranky
Short sleep makes pre-school children cranky: Confirming common bias, parent reports from nearly 9,000 children in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study shows increased risks [1.3-1.8 fold] of overactivity, anger, aggression, and impulsivity in children sleeping less than 9.44 hours.

Kids who sleep poorly with asthma do worse in school
Conrad Iber, MD, program medical director for Fairview Sleep Centers, reports that a study of 170 urban children 7-9 years old showed that the children had decreases in school performance related to a combination of poorer sleep quality as measured by actigraphy, and more active asthma as measured by breathing tests and asthma symptom scores. Peak worsening of asthma is typically 4 a.m.  Iber points out that this is the first study linking asthma intensity to school performance.

Sleep + Work...How little sleep is too little?
Fox 9 News interviewed Conrad Iber, MD, program medical director for Fairview Sleep Centers, on the relationship between sleep, work and overall good health.

Why is springing forward harder than falling back?
March 8, 2013 -- Conrad Iber, MD, program medical director for Fairview Sleep Centers, was interviewed for WCCO-TV’s morning show regarding the change to daylight savings time. The story explains why "springing" forward is harder than "falling" back and offered tips that everyone could use to prepare for the time change.

Tennis balls keep sleepers off their backs.
Michael Howell, MD, Fairview Sleep Centers, appeared on the WCCO morning show to explain why sleeping on their backs is the worst position for some people. He described how some patients stay on their sides by making a “tennis ball t-shirt..”

Is there a link between sleeping less and eating more?
A recent  study showed a link between insufficient sleep and weight gain. According to the study, food intake increased above energy needs with two weeks of five hours of nightly sleep in 16 adults and resulted in weight gain that was only partially recovered when the study participants resumed a schedule with adequate sleep. According to Conrad Iber, MD, program medical director for Fairview Sleep Centers, this small field study adds to consistent experimental and population data showing a risk of obesity associated with inadequate sleep.

Results of 12-year study show increased risk of heart failure in people with more symptoms of insomnia
Conrad Iber, MD, program medical director for Fairview Sleep Centers, cites a study which shows the risk of heart failure increases with intensity of insomnia symptoms: The longitudinal study of 54,279 people over 12 years shows a 4.35 fold risk of new onset of heart failure in those with multiple symptoms of insomnia. 
 
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